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Views, the highly anticipated fourth studio album from Drake was released on 4/29. The album is a unique mix of upbeat club bangers with hints of Dancehall and slower, more lyrical tracks sampling Ideal, Ray J, and Beenie Man to name a few. Although the percussion in every song doesn’t change very much, the other instrumentation does and it shows the artist’s versatility.

“Weston Road Flows” is the sixth track on the album and is by far the most mellow track on the project. Listeners can hear actual drums instead of a drum machine generated bass and snare. The song is very smooth and could easily be mistaken for a 90’s R&B joint due to Mary J. Blige’s “Mary’s Joint” sample throughout. It’s one of those tracks that you can play in your room or while cruising down the highway but it’s not one of the songs you’d hear in the club or at a party.

In the first verse, Drake discusses struggles of growing up in a poor neighborhood with his friend Renny and how the fame has changed his relationships. “[I] used to have secret handshakes to confirm my friendships. Nowadays they just shakin’ my hand to hide the tension.” He further mentions how he got to where he is because of purpose-driven hard work rather than handouts and that things aren’t as peachy as they may seem because “a lot of problems can’t be fixed with a conversation.”

Juxtaposed to the first half of the track, 6 God proclaims himself as “the most successful rapper 35 and under”, saying that he plans to retire from the game at that age. Drake does a great job of balancing his story-telling abilities with the bravado that rappers are almost expected to have in their lyrics at some point.

Graham ends the song by stating that although money can’t buy happiness, he’s happiest when he’s able to do what he wants to, and money can buy freedom. Weston Road Flows has lyrics that make one reflect on their own experiences and ultimately think, is the fame worth losing friendships?

Whether listeners agree with the rapper’s opinion is yet to be seen, as over 800,000 copies have been sold within the first week. Although the album isn’t as diverse as Take Care, arguably his best project to date, Drake has reaffirmed his status as one of the top dogs in the game and has given us a view of his home life.