Rohan da Great is out here making moves and we love to see the great progress of this super talented artist. While he has three genres on lock, including EDM, Reggae, and hip hop, Rohan da Great can not be stopped. Highly respectable among peers and striving as the business man that he is, the New York bred and North Carolina-based artist is mastering his craft right in front of our eyes. From the last time that we interviewed him, which was almost a year ago, he is back to catch us up on his recent plans and music. Peep the interview below.

What have you been up to since the last time we’ve talked? What’s new with Rohan da Great?

I’m been touring more than anything. I’m taking advantage of all of the touring opportunities over the last couple of month and trying to reach out to new fans. Also I’ve been in the studio recording tons of music. I have enough music for the next two years!

Wow. That’s amazing. So let’s talk about that touring experience. What did you do differently than the first tour you were on?

I would say I definitely learned how to step my performance game up. After touring and watching playback of multiple performances, I felt like I was doing the same thing over and over again. So I got creative with my performances and getting the crowd more involved. That is what pushed me to get better. Now, I do a good job of controlling the crowd. It’s not an easy thing to do at times, especially when you go to new places and the crowd doesn’t know who you are, you have to break that ice. My touring experience gives me that comfort now. Before I used to have butterflies and psyched myself up hoping that I do good. Now there aren’t butterflies. I’m more comfortable with performing. It’s natural now. With that I learned how to critique myself more. We are getting more money from performing, so I want people to get their money’s worth. You know?

As an artist, how have you grown?

I have grown tremendously. The music that I have now is so much better than what I was doing before. And it’s not much in the sense of content because I am still talking about my life, but my sound is more polished. I believe I’m maturing and mastering my craft. I think performing helped with that too.

Also as an artist, I used to let things slide. I don’t do that now. I can’t let nothing slide because something small can turn into a big [problem in the future]. I don’t have money or time to waste. I’m a nice guy, but not nice in business.

On top of those things, I’ve learned to network better. I used to network with people and it might not turn out the way that I thought or planned, so I had to change my approach. I approach DJs, and people in the media differently than before. I just reevaluate myself and took notes on what I did before and how to change it up. That’s another way I’ve grown.

Let’s jump into the singles.

Right now, we have the new version of “Suppose to Be,” a track off The Real EP. So we are remixing it and releasing it as a radio single. Everybody liked that songs off the EP and we wanted to make it as an official single. Of course we can’t put out the EP version as a single. We had to have it stand on its own. We changed up the part of the song that was sampled from Junior Kelly. He’s a Reggae artist and I was paying homage to him. It’s a part in the song, “if love so nice/why it hurts so bad,” that I used. So.. I had to take that out because dealing with publishing and Licenses is a headache (laughs). So rather than go through that, I just removed it and remixed it. It sounds like the same song, but it has a new feel to it. It feels more genuine. You can feel the pain in this sound, unlike before it was more on the clean side. This [version] is more gritty and dirty. But, overall we got that coming because the fans requested it.

I also have a new hip hop single called “HIT” that’s dropping real soon. I actually did it as a freestyle and then when everyone heard it they were like “this is litty!” so we decided to release it as a song. It has that New York sound and wave to it. Everyone knows I rep New York to the fullest. In my music, I’ve been so personal and talking about my life, that I haven’t been able to show that New York swag in some of my songs. This song is in the lanes of a Bobby Shmurda or Young MA as far as production wise. Ironically the song was also produced by NY Bangers the producers of Young MA’s “Ooouuu”. People have been waiting for that from me like my man hit me one time and was like “yo we like hearing about your life, but we want some aggression.” So this was perfect. We have more hip hop tracks on the way, but we are going to surprise them with that.

On the Reggae side, I have this song “Island Girl” that I’ve been performing at the last couple of Reggae shows. Everywhere I’ve performed it, people loved it. So I’ve decided “Island Girl” is going to be my next Reggae single. It’s a follow up from “SummerTime.” It’s a nice dancehall song with a little bit of Afrobeat to it. I’m calling it from now, I think Afrobeat is going to be the sound of the summer as far a Caribbean/African sounding type music. It’s something for the ladies But it’s not the typical song about Island girls we talking about more than their wine and looks. You really have to listen. And of course we have “Money Maker” and the reception from that has been crazy. We’ve been holding on to this track for a while but, I’m trying to find the right home for that joint. We have been talking to different distribution companies to get it on a platform where the world can hear it and a place where it can be appreciated. I want this song to be big. It’s that type of song and i don’t want to miss out on it

Lastly, I actually have a band now. I started to write and produce a whole album a few years back and I had the songs but i felt like it wasn’t the right time to put them out. Luckily I didn’t put it out because now I have the band and we are going to redo the tracks. We’re going to record it actually live, like the whole album. So, basically there are all of the new releases I have coming out.

You do well in all genres. So what is the genre (hip hop, EDM, or Reggae) that the easiest to promote and market?

I would say Reggae because I come from a Reggae background and a lot of people know my father or my uncle Super Dane. I seen that that kind of helps. I reach out to different outlets and they see those names in my bio, then they want to check it out. But from that point it’s up to me to impress them with my music. I don’t want people to think that it’s an automatic “Yes” or anyting. But in general It’s [Reggae] a little easier to market because the tastemakers are more approachable. Like with hip hop tastemakers, they might want thousands and thousands of dollars to advertise your product without really feeling it and a lot of Reggae people just rock with it if they like. With Reggae, it’s not a lot of competition whereas hip hop is more saturated. For Reggae, as long as I come with a strong song that’s a potential hit I can get radio plays or shows and things like that, because my resume is already building up. Honestly the people in the hip hop industry can be a little greedy and that’s just the plain truth. It is easy to get scammed in hip hop scene due to fake promoters on social media and people claiming they have connects. So artists have to be careful with things like that. The competition is heightened in hip hop because there are sooo many rappers. It’s like being one out of a million. As for EDM, it is pretty cool and may be a little easiear than hip hop as well. From my experiances I feel that As long as I am working with the right Dj/Producer and distribution label, I will be fine as long as a bring heat. It can be pushed and will have an impact.

But at the end of it all, we are just working hard. I have the hip hop creditability. I’ve been making good moves in hip hop. I feel like those moves aren’t on the same levels of the ones I’ve made in the other genres; but the success I have in other genres is going to help me be more success with hip hop and I have a feeling all that is gonna change, Real Soon!

Anything else you would like to share with our readers?

I want to talk to the independent artists out there. No matter what, keep pushing and keep doing what you are doing. It’s hard. Trust me I know. At every level there’s a different setback. Some people think once you get further, that things get easier, but they don’t. Things get harder actually. At every level, there’s more expected of you and you must deliver better and better at a larger scale. Keep your head up. Don’t get discouraged if you have to sacrifice. I’ve sold like a lot of my own personal studio equipment, just to make sure the my releases comes out. So artists, just keep making moves and those sacrifices will pay off. Just watch over the next couple of months and see how my sacrifices have advanced my career.

CONNECT:

Twitter | Instagram:
@RohandaGreatMC